Extension

 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences recently selected outstanding faculty and staff to be awarded for their contributions to the education, service, research, and dedication that makes CALS so great. The Department of Agronomy would like to recognize our very own who were awarded.

 

 

An online, interactive course to develop successful long-term weed management programs.

Plan ahead. Dealing with herbicide resistance can be expensive. The United States Department of Agriculture estimates the cost of dealing with herbicide resistance once it occurs to be $20 to $60 per acre. Therefore, implementing a long-term weed management strategy that reduces the chances of resistance developing will maximize long-term profitability.

This online, interactive, and self-paced course contains narrated presentations, lesson activities, and resources to provide farmers and agribusiness professionals the tools to develop successful long-term weed management plans that will maximize long-term profitability. Well worth the $50 to register.

Register here

waterhemp seedling

The Iowa Crop Performance Tests are gearing up for their 100th year of gauging the yields of hundreds of seed varieties, an annual effort that helps farmers decide what seeds to plant the following year.

2019 Soil Health Conference Registration Is Open

Conference focus is on science and practices for advancing soil health

Mahdi Al-Kaisi

two hands holding soil.AMES, Iowa – The third Soil Health Conference will be held in Ames on Feb. 4-5, 2019. The event will consist of two full days of presentations on a wide variety of topics concerning soil health, with invited guest speakers from around the country.

ICM News

The Integrated Crop Management (ICM) website is a convenient, central location for producers to access a variety of crop production information, including: agronomy, soils and environment, weeds, integrated pest management, water quality, and grain handling and storage. Contributors to the site represent the Iowa State University Extension and Outreach crops team, which includes about 30 faculty and staff.

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Boone, Iowa held the nation’s largest outdoor farming event: The Farm Progress Show. This event took place August 28th through August 30th.  There were lots of new information to talk about over the three day event, some of that ranged from butterflies all the way to new tools that would greatly benefit agronomists.

Conservation Learning Group, a think tank dedicated to addressing conservation and environmental challenges, was established as a part of Iowa State University Extension and Outreach in July 2018. The group is a collaboration of researchers, educators and advocates having the goal to better understand issues and come up with creative, sustainable solutions that are repeatable at scale. Our Drs. Mark Licht and Emily Heaton are involved in the project.

Representatives from bioengineering, social science, agronomy, crop science, soil science, wildlife management, water resource management and conservation are on the CLG team. Specialists from other areas of study will be welcomed to contribute to the group’s goals.

The 2018 growing season is well underway. It is now time to start assessing the rewards of the spring planting season. Our first FACTS (Forecasting and Assessment of Cropping sysTemS) is now live for the 2018 growing season. There have been a couple of changes going into our fourth year. A field site at the ISU Northern and McNay Research and Demonstration farms have been added to increase geographic coverage. For each site only the ‘normal’ or treatment nearest ‘normal’ is included on the webpage to reduce complexity. Yield forecasts have been moved to the opening page of the Forecast Tool and relative yield values have been removed. We hope these changes make for a more meaningful user experience.

Several field days are happening across the state throughout the month of June. Hear from our faculty experts along with other faculty and Extension and Outreach specialists about a variety of crop and pest related topics.

June 20 at 9:00 am: Northern Research Farm Summer Field Day - Kanawha, Iowa

A season review from ag specialists Matt Schnabel and Brandon Zwiefel
Sulfur use - Dr. John Sawyer
Weed control - Dr. Bob Hartzler
Cereal rye for seed - Dean Sponheim & Jamie Benning
Crop production issues - Paul Kassel & Angie Rieck-Hinz

June 27 at 1:00 pm: Northeast Iowa Agricultural Experimental Association Annual Spring Field Day - Nashua, Iowa

Crop weather outlook - Dr. Elwynn Taylor
Strip till and no till research - Dr. Mahdi Al-Kaisi
Nitrogen fertility - Dr. John Sawyer
Insect scouting and tips - Brian Lang

Row spacing is a management decision that often comes up as a priority for achieving high-yielding soybean. Research across the Midwest over several years has consistently shown that soybean planted in narrow rows (<30 inches) has a yield advantage compared to wide rows (≥ 30 inches). The primary reason for this advantage is light utilization; canopy closure is approximately 15 days earlier in 15-inch rows compared to 30-inch rows. Canopy closure earlier in the growing season results in greater light interception and higher growth rates. 

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