corn

One of the pressing questions this fall is when corn will reach maturity and if there is going to be enough time to dry down in the field. We have developed and released a corn grain dry down calculator that can help determine how quickly corn grain moisture will dry down in the field. The calculator can be applied at any location across the Corn Belt, from North Dakota to Missouri and from Nebraska to Ohio. Users select a map location and then enter a date and a kernel moisture content at that date. In turn, the tool projects in-field corn dry down. This tool can be used to estimate when a specific field will reach appropriately moisture for mechanical harvest (15-20% moisture) based on user input. The tool allows scenario planning by entering estimated dates and grain moisture for crops that are yet to mature compared to fields where crops have already matured.

Prepare for a long harvest season.

Planting delays in Iowa last spring could prevent a significant portion of this year’s corn crop from maturing on time, said Iowa State University agriculture experts. That means farmers may still have corn to harvest deep into November as they attempt to give their corn fields as much time to dry down as possible.

An early freeze could stop a portion of the corn crop from reaching maturity, and farmers will watch temperatures closely in the coming weeks, the ISU experts said.

Leandro Tonello Zuffo, a PhD student visiting from Federal University of Viçosa in Brazil with an interest in agronomy arrived to Iowa State University on August 30, 2018 and is conducting research with Dr. Thomas Lubberstedt. Leandro’s research focus is on the application of tools and methods provided by genome analysis to understand the composition of complex traits and phenomena, to determine and exploit genetic diversity in elite and exotic germplasm and apply this knowledge to plant breeding.

Dr. Prashant Jha
Associate Professor
Extension Weed Specialist

New research published this week identifies the genomic features that might have made domestication possible for corn and soybeans, two of the world’s most critical crop species.

The research, published Wednesday in the peer-reviewed academic journal Genome Biology, has implications for how scientists understand domestication, or the process by which humans have been able to breed plants for desirable traits through centuries of cultivation. The researchers drew on vast amounts of data on the genomes of corn and soybeans and compared particular sections of the genomes of wild species and domestic varieties, noting where the genomes diverged most markedly.

Corn Stand Reduction and Green Snap (2019-2021)

Stand Reduction: National Crop Insurance Services (NCIS) has conducted research for hail adjusting loss instructions for corn that include assessing losses from stand reduction/loss, defoliation, direct damage to stems and ears, etc.  Past stand reduction research has led to the development of two loss tables for stand reduction/losses. One applies to stand reduction up through the 10th leaf stage (approx.

By Fred Love, University News Service

AMES, Iowa – The immense number of possible hybrids that can be created from inbred corn plants can leave plant breeders wondering where to start when attempting to produce new crop varieties with desirable traits. But new research from an Iowa State University agronomist shows how advanced data mining techniques can enhance the efficiency of the process.

AMES, Iowa – The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is honoring seven Iowa State University researchers for their work in agriculture, biological sciences, chemistry and engineering, including our Dr. Jianming Yu.

The seven are among 416 researchers from around the world who make up this year’s class of AAAS Fellows, the association announced today. The new fellows are being recognized “because of their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished.” Dr. Yu joins the limited company of only 40 other faculty at Iowa State University as a AAAS Fellow.

Variable rate seeding prescription evaluate in corn (2018-2020)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate different methodologies for developing variable rate seeding prescriptions in corn. Three prescription methods will be evaluated on yield and economics compared to a farmer chosen uniform rate. The three variable rate methods are normalized yield, topographic wetness index, and Corn Suitability Rating. This will be conducted in central Iowa in 2018 and 2019.

Other PIs include: Nick Upah with Iowa State Research and Demonstration Farms

Post-maturity in-field dry down of corn kernels and soybean seeds (2015-2018)

​ The quality and moisture content of the seeds at harvest can significantly influence profitability. We collect corn and soybean seeds from field experiments to develop models to improve our ability to predict moisture content at harvest for new corn hybrids and soybean varieties.

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