corn

Variable rate seeding prescription evaluate in corn (2018-2020)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate different methodologies for developing variable rate seeding prescriptions in corn. Three prescription methods will be evaluated on yield and economics compared to a farmer chosen uniform rate. The three variable rate methods are normalized yield, topographic wetness index, and Corn Suitability Rating. This will be conducted in central Iowa in 2018 and 2019.

Other PIs include: Nick Upah with Iowa State Research and Demonstration Farms

By Ellen Bombela, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Communications Service

Jianming Yu is considered one of the top scientists in the world in quantitative genetics, which integrates plant breeding, genomics, molecular genetics and statistics.

His goal is to develop and implement new strategies and methods in trait dissection and crop improvement. His work has earned him the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Raymond and Mary Baker Agronomic Excellence Award.

His success is driven by constantly asking questions.

Swetabh Patel
Graduate Assistant-Research
Dr. Jianming Yu
Professor
Pioneer Distinguished Chair in Maize Breeding

Recent years of high rainfall and prolonged wet soil conditions in Iowa have renewed interest to protect losses of fertilizer nitrogen (N) in corn. This study evaluated effect of N additives and a slow-release urea product on the soil NO3–N fraction of total inorganic N, mid–vegetative growth N stress, grain yield, and corn nitrogen use efficiency. Earn 1 CEU in Nutrient Management by reading this article and taking the quiz at www.certifiedcropadviser.org/education/classroom/classes/516.

 

Crops and Soils Magazine - Digital Extra, October 5, 2017

AMES, Iowa – Organic agriculture practices eschew many synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, putting pressure on crops that conventional farming circumvents. That means an organic farmer who doesn’t use herbicides, for instance, would value crop varieties better suited to withstand weeds.

Enter Thomas Lubberstedt, a professor of agronomy at Iowa State University. Lubberstedt and a team of ISU researchers recently received a four-year, $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to advance organic corn varieties. By the end of the project, the team aims to have identified elite varieties that will improve the performance of corn under organic growing conditions.

“Our main goal is to figure out whether new genetic mechanisms can benefit organic field and sweet corn varieties,” Lubberstedt said. “We want to develop traits that can do well under organic conditions.”

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