crop production and physiology

Mitch Baum grew up in central Iowa. A Bondurant Blue Jay, he came to Iowa State to be an engineer.

“One problem, I didn’t really understand what engineers did on a day to day basis,” said Baum.

After realizing engineering wasn’t as hands on as he had hoped, Baum remembered a class about soil he really enjoyed taught by Dr. Michael Thompson.

“I didn’t grow up on a farm,” said Baum. “I had no experience with agronomy but I took that class and wound up talking soil chemistry with Dr. Thompson during his office hours.”

Based on his interest in soil chemistry, Baum made the switch changing his major to agronomy.

Angelos arrived at Iowa State University on March 19, 2019 for a five-month program. During his visit, Angelos has been working with Dr. Archontoulis to provide technical support on the FACTS project and design a web interface and data flow simulation model that will be used to show yield predictions. Angelos is also working to create a website that would provide project information and updates to site visitors. Dr. Archontoulis said, “I have really enjoy hosting Angelos because of his motivation and drive to learn and participate in the project.” Angelos has contributed a significant amount of technical support to the project, but has also valued all that he has learned from Dr. Archontoulis and his colleagues that have been working on the project. Angelos said, “When first arriving to Iowa State, I had little knowledge about agriculture as my studies are in computer science and engineering, but after spending time with Dr. Sotirios I have gained a wealth of knowledge on the industry as well as enhanced my computer science skills through hands on learning opportunities.”

Corn Stand Reduction and Green Snap (2019-2021)

Stand Reduction: National Crop Insurance Services (NCIS) has conducted research for hail adjusting loss instructions for corn that include assessing losses from stand reduction/loss, defoliation, direct damage to stems and ears, etc.  Past stand reduction research has led to the development of two loss tables for stand reduction/losses. One applies to stand reduction up through the 10th leaf stage (approx.

Soybean Defoliation at Mid-Reproductive Stage (2016-2018)

Previous research conducted at Purdue University at beginning flowering and pod set growth stages updated defoliation loss tables for current variety genetics, management practices, and climate. However, it also brought into question the defoliation loss tables for later reproductive stage soybean. This project occured in Iowa and Indiana (Shaun Casteel). Defoliation events were timed at full pod set (R4) and beginning seed fill (R5) reproductive stages.

Putting It All Together: An Innovative Approach to Increasing Iowa's Conservation Infrastructure (2018-2021)

The goal of this project is to positively change the skill sets and attitudes of professional agronomists, farmers and agricultural students to accelerate the adoption of agricultural systems that build soil health and reduce nutrient losses.

Objectives include: 

matt nowatzke headshot
Matt Nowatzke
Graduate Research Assistant

Redefining the field edge (2018-2021)

This project seeks to reevaluate the traditional “field edge,” investigating the long-term productivity and profitability of in-field low lying depressional areas. While traditionally planted to agricultural row crops, in the majority of years these marginal areas require significant inputs resulting in only modest crop yields and returns on investment. Can these marginal land areas be taken out of row crop production and transitioned to perennial vegetation to increase the return on investment with fewer acres and less risk?

Improving cereal rye cover crop BMPs to increase adoption of cover crops by Iowa farmers (2018-2020)

Issue: The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy (INRS) calls for cover crop implementation on over 12 million acres, which equates to every other field. Despite numerous environmental benefits associated with cover crops, many farmers are still hesitant to change their current production practices. Major barriers to introducing cover crops as a conservation practice include cost of implementation, yield drag, and knowledge.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - crop production and physiology