Department of Agronomy

A new rhizobial species,Bradyrhizobium frederickii, has been named in honor of the late Professor Llyod R. Frederick who was a professor of soil microbiology in the Iowa State Department of Agronomy.

The rhizobial species is a nitrogen-fixing lineage that is isolated from nodules of the caesalpinioid species Chamaecrista fasciculata and is characterized by tolerance to high temperature in vitro.

Padma Somasegaran, PhD and retired microbiologist, knew Professor Frederick for many years when he was with the NifTAL Project at the University of Hawaii Department of Agronomy and Soil Science. At the time, Professor Frederick was with USAID in Washington DC and would frequent Hawaii. 

Junior in agronomy Marjorie Hanneman spent her summer working for Bayer Crop Science in Ankeny, Iowa at the high throughput genotyping facility as the Molecular Breeding Intern.

On a daily basis, Marjorie utilized lab robots to conduct real time PCR on a variety of crops and genetic traits. The project she worked on focused on testing and validating new master mix for quality and efficiency across crops, markers, and traits. She also used automated machinery to complete her daily activities as well as data collection and analysis.

"My favorite part of my internship was being able to complete lab work at such a large scale. I was able to work with about 15 different crops and learn how to manage huge data sets and design experiments. I also enjoyed working with state of the art machinery and robots and being at the forefront of biotechnology," Marjorie said.

Senior in agronomy Costas Hatzipavlides was a US Row Crop Sales Intern for Bayer last summer. 

On a typical day, Costas visited saleman and customers and addressed their needs. Each day posed a new adventure, such as putting in plots, going on sales calls, and evaluating and selling hybrids, varieties, and chemicals to customers. Costas enjoyed bringing solutions to customers the most as well as working on a fun team.

"Agronomy set me up with technical skills that made me stand our versus competitive companies. Iowa State University agronomy simply sets you up with a better skillset," Costas said.

Costas explained that internships help you to network and find out what company you want to work for after college. He recommends doing as many internships as you can because they help you apply what you learn in class as well as learn new things that you may never learn in a classroom.

Senior in agronomy Trace Bolsinger spent his summer working for the USDA: Natural Resource Conservation Service as a soil conservationist trainee. 

Trace spent his days working with landowners to develop, implement, maintain, and revise complex conservation plans under the 2018 Farm Bill. He also helped promote, market, and implement the initiatives of the 2018 Farm Bill. Maintaining positive relationships with private companies as well as state and federal agencies that were in relation to natural resource concerns was also an important role for Trace. He also had the opportunity to evaluate the implementation of conservation plans and their alternatives under supervision.

New students in agronomy had the opportunity to go on a field trip and visit various industry locations around North West Iowa as well as network with professionals and other students within the major. The trip was from Friday, August 23 to Saturday, August 26 and was organized by Mary Wiedenhoeft. Other agronomy faculty members also helped with the trip.

The group began by visitng NEW Co-op at Roelyn and then traveled to the Bormann Ag Center and NRCS in Bode, IA. They then spent the afternoon at Corteva Agrisciences in Algona, IA where they were able to visit both the production and research facilities. They ended the night with visiting Mycogen Seed in Storm Lake, IA and grabbing some pizza for supper.

The Brown Graduate Fellowship has been awarded to two Agronomy Graduate students, Qi Mu and Mauricio Tejera. The Brown Graduate Fellowship is to be used to strategically advance ISU research in the areas of study that are governed by the Valentine Hammes Family and Leopold Hammes Brown Family Trust.  The areas of study include science, agriculture, and space science. The preference is to fund Ph.D. students, although exceptional M.S. students will be considered.

 

Brown Graduate Fellowship Awardee

Taylor Berkshire is a senior majoring ing Agronomy, Environmental Science and international Agriculture.

Alyssa Dean is a Junior in Agronomy and Agricultural Business.

This past summer, Alyssa worked for Heartland Coop in Treynor, Iowa and Henderson, Iowa as a crop scout/sales intern.

To this point, Alyssa has did a little bit of everything with her internship. She tissue sampled, hauled chemicals, scouted fields, set plot signs and met with growers. Alyssa said that “I was always busy doing something; there is never a dull moment during the work day. “

Josh Behnke is a Senior in Agronomy

He has been an Agronomy Club member for 3 years

This summer, Josh was located in Northeast Iowa, based out of Dubuque for DuPont Pioneer. His title was Northeast Iowa Agronomy Sales Intern; he worked with the “Pioneer field agronomists to help with service calls, population trials, new product plot evaluations/data as well as customer and sales rep relations”.

Adam Guy is a Senior in Agronomy with a minor in Agricultural Business

Adam has been heavily involved with Agronomy Club. He is currently serving as the club’s treasurer. In the past served as our CALS council representative and social chair. He has helped at popcorn and doughnut sales, 4-H experience agronomy and attending fun club social events. 

Over the summer, Adam worked for the Iowa Soybean Association located in Ankeny, Iowa. When asked what his role is this summer he responded with “My role within the Iowa Soybean Association is working with the on-farm network to collect research data from on farm trials across the state of Iowa. Then I analyze the data collected and use it to correlate the results.” 

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