double haploid

On March 6 a former Iowa State professor was recognized for his ground-breaking work in plant breeding. Dr. Sherret Chase was presented the Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Award for Sustained Excellence for sustaining a high level of excellence throughout the course of his distinguished career beginning with the development of the ‘monoploid method’ which contributed to a transformation in plant breeding, accelerating the speed of selection for desirable traits resulting in stronger strains of maize. Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Science Endowed Dean Daniel J. Robison presented the award at the Raymond F. Baker Plant Breeding Symposium held at the Iowa State Alumni Center.

Thomas Lübberstedt is pushing the boundaries of genetics and its use in developing tools and methods to make plant breeding more efficient.

His work is leading to improved virus resistance and more sustainable agricultural systems around the world. The Frey Chair in Agronomy and Director of the Raymond F. Baker Center for Plant Breeding, Lübberstedt recently received the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences’ Outstanding Achievement in Research Award.

International Credentials
Lübberstedt grew up on a horticultural farm in Germany and earned his degrees from the universities of Munich and Hohenheim. He spent several years working in Germany, and then Denmark, before coming to Iowa State in 2007 to take an endowed chair position.

Leandro Tonello Zuffo, a PhD student visiting from Federal University of Viçosa in Brazil with an interest in agronomy arrived to Iowa State University on August 30, 2018 and is conducting research with Dr. Thomas Lubberstedt. Leandro’s research focus is on the application of tools and methods provided by genome analysis to understand the composition of complex traits and phenomena, to determine and exploit genetic diversity in elite and exotic germplasm and apply this knowledge to plant breeding.

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