SDS

Overexpression of soybean gene might lead to resistance from SDS and more

No matter if it is 50 acres or 50,000, crop producers must hone their management practices to maximize yield while minimizing costs. Any number of different pathogens or pests can derail a good season. Soybean farmers in Iowa know how devastating they can be, with some causing millions in losses each year.

“Transgenic Approaches In Managing Sudden Death Syndrome In Soybean”

Our long-term goal is to create soybean cultivars resistant to soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS). Soybean is one of the world’s most valuable crops and the U.S. is the world leader in soybean production. In 2010 the U.S. soybean crop value was over $38.9 billion. Soybean suffers yield suppression from various biotic stresses, including SDS, which in 2010 caused losses valued at $0.82 billion. 

 

The transdisciplinary project team consists of experts from states and countries where soybean is an important crop: Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Brazil and Argentina.  

AMES, Iowa – An Iowa State University agronomist is charting mechanisms – gene by gene – that could lead to soybean varieties resistant to sudden death syndrome.

A paper published recently in the peer-reviewed academic journal Plant Physiology shows a gene found in a model plant called Arabidopsis could confer improved disease resistance in soybeans. Madan Bhattacharyya, a professor of agronomy and lead author of the study, said his current research points toward several Arabidopsis genes that could act in concert to help soybeans fight off sudden death syndrome, a disease that has caused millions of dollars in crop losses for Iowa farmers.

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