soil health

Massive networks of drains, pipes and tiles that enable food production on much of the world’s most productive cropland are due for expansion and replacement to meet the demands of agricultural intensification and climate change. How that infrastructure is updated will have enormous consequences on food production and the environment, according to a new study.

The Hora brothers won Best of Show during the 2019 Iowa State Fair 'pitch-off' for their business Continuum Ag. Mitchell Hora is an agronomy alum and his brother David will join the agronomy family as a freshman this Fall. 

Continuum Ag was established by Mitchell as an agricultural consulting company offering soil sampling and fertility analysis. With a realization that traditional agronomic consulting only addresses the chemical soil component, Continuum Ag has differentiated itself by working with growers that take a more holistic approach, recognizing the physical and biological aspects of soil as well.

From the Continuum Ag website:

Putting It All Together: An Innovative Approach to Increasing Iowa's Conservation Infrastructure (2018-2021)

The goal of this project is to positively change the skill sets and attitudes of professional agronomists, farmers and agricultural students to accelerate the adoption of agricultural systems that build soil health and reduce nutrient losses.

Objectives include: 

AMES, Iowa – Researchers at Iowa State University will test how the environmental benefits of planting strips of prairie among row crops change over time, filling in an unexplored gap in prairie strip research that stretches back over a decade.

Cole Dutter
Cole R Dutter
Graduate Assistant-Teaching

2019 Soil Health Conference Registration Is Open

Conference focus is on science and practices for advancing soil health

Mahdi Al-Kaisi

two hands holding soil.AMES, Iowa – The third Soil Health Conference will be held in Ames on Feb. 4-5, 2019. The event will consist of two full days of presentations on a wide variety of topics concerning soil health, with invited guest speakers from around the country.

Originally posted by the College of Engineering

A consortium of young Iowa State university researchers including our Dr. Marshall McDaniel has gone where few like them have gone before – as recipients of a large grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to mature and translate a platform technology with a global industry partner.

The group, including four Iowa State assistant professors and one associate professor, have launched a project to develop materials and methods for scalable manufacturing of  flexible resonant sensors and their wireless readers under support of a $750,000 award made available through the NSF Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) program  The industrial partner on this award is DuPont with two co-PIs from their Advanced Electronics business.

By Caroline Schneider, University of Wisconsin Madision

Organic farmers are in a tough spot when it comes to controlling weeds. Since conventional herbicides aren’t an option, many choose to use tillage — mechanically turning over the soil to upend weeds. However, tillage can take a toll on soil health and cause run-off. Increasingly, organic farmers are seeking better ways to control weeds while preserving soil health.

Boone, Iowa held the nation’s largest outdoor farming event: The Farm Progress Show. This event took place August 28th through August 30th.  There were lots of new information to talk about over the three day event, some of that ranged from butterflies all the way to new tools that would greatly benefit agronomists.

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