soil health

Putting It All Together: An Innovative Approach to Increasing Iowa's Conservation Infrastructure (2018-2021)

The goal of this project is to positively change the skill sets and attitudes of professional agronomists, farmers and agricultural students to accelerate the adoption of agricultural systems that build soil health and reduce nutrient losses.

Objectives include: 

AMES, Iowa – Researchers at Iowa State University will test how the environmental benefits of planting strips of prairie among row crops change over time, filling in an unexplored gap in prairie strip research that stretches back over a decade.

Cole Dutter
Cole R Dutter
Graduate Assistant-Teaching

2019 Soil Health Conference Registration Is Open

Conference focus is on science and practices for advancing soil health

Mahdi Al-Kaisi

two hands holding soil.AMES, Iowa – The third Soil Health Conference will be held in Ames on Feb. 4-5, 2019. The event will consist of two full days of presentations on a wide variety of topics concerning soil health, with invited guest speakers from around the country.

Originally posted by the College of Engineering

A consortium of young Iowa State university researchers including our Dr. Marshall McDaniel has gone where few like them have gone before – as recipients of a large grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to mature and translate a platform technology with a global industry partner.

The group, including four Iowa State assistant professors and one associate professor, have launched a project to develop materials and methods for scalable manufacturing of  flexible resonant sensors and their wireless readers under support of a $750,000 award made available through the NSF Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) program  The industrial partner on this award is DuPont with two co-PIs from their Advanced Electronics business.

By Caroline Schneider, University of Wisconsin Madision

Organic farmers are in a tough spot when it comes to controlling weeds. Since conventional herbicides aren’t an option, many choose to use tillage — mechanically turning over the soil to upend weeds. However, tillage can take a toll on soil health and cause run-off. Increasingly, organic farmers are seeking better ways to control weeds while preserving soil health.

Boone, Iowa held the nation’s largest outdoor farming event: The Farm Progress Show. This event took place August 28th through August 30th.  There were lots of new information to talk about over the three day event, some of that ranged from butterflies all the way to new tools that would greatly benefit agronomists.

For Hannah Corey it doesn’t get much better than spending the summer before her senior year working for Anheuser-Busch making some of the best beer in the world.

As an Anheuser-Busch Agronomist Intern in Idaho Falls, Idaho, Corey is spending the summer working on the company’s barley production team.

“Here in Idaho, we grow the barley and turn it into malt for beer production,” said Corey. “Three out of every six pack of Budweiser’s are made with Idaho barley!”

Corey’s focused on three main tasks this summer: a soil health project, a barley production guide and SmartBarley grower surveys.

Several field days are happening across the state throughout the month of June. Hear from our faculty experts along with other faculty and Extension and Outreach specialists about a variety of crop and pest related topics.

June 20 at 9:00 am: Northern Research Farm Summer Field Day - Kanawha, Iowa

A season review from ag specialists Matt Schnabel and Brandon Zwiefel
Sulfur use - Dr. John Sawyer
Weed control - Dr. Bob Hartzler
Cereal rye for seed - Dean Sponheim & Jamie Benning
Crop production issues - Paul Kassel & Angie Rieck-Hinz

June 27 at 1:00 pm: Northeast Iowa Agricultural Experimental Association Annual Spring Field Day - Nashua, Iowa

Crop weather outlook - Dr. Elwynn Taylor
Strip till and no till research - Dr. Mahdi Al-Kaisi
Nitrogen fertility - Dr. John Sawyer
Insect scouting and tips - Brian Lang

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