Research

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is a C4 species sensitive to the cold spring conditions that occur at northern latitudes, especially when coupled with excessive light, and that greatly affect the photosynthetic rate. The objective of this study was to discover genes/genomic regions that control the capacity to cope with excessive energy under low temperature conditions during the vegetative growth period. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted for seven photosynthetic gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence traits under three consecutive temperature treatments: control (28 °C/24 °C), cold (15 °C/15 °C), and recovery (28 °C/24 °C). Cold stress significantly reduced the rate of photosynthetic CO2 uptake of sorghum plants, and a total of 143 unique genomic regions were discovered associated with at least one trait in a particular treatment or with derived variables.

Antonio Mallarino, Matthew Helmers, Richard Cruse, John Sawyer, Dan Jaynes 

Javed Iqbal, Magdalena Necpalova, Sotirios V. Archontoulis, Robert P. Anex, Marie Bourguignon, Daryl Herzmann, David C. Mitchell, John E. Sawyer, Qing Zhu, Michael J. Castellano

AMES, Iowa – Organic agriculture practices eschew many synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, putting pressure on crops that conventional farming circumvents. That means an organic farmer who doesn’t use herbicides, for instance, would value crop varieties better suited to withstand weeds.

Enter Thomas Lubberstedt, a professor of agronomy at Iowa State University. Lubberstedt and a team of ISU researchers recently received a four-year, $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to advance organic corn varieties. By the end of the project, the team aims to have identified elite varieties that will improve the performance of corn under organic growing conditions.

“Our main goal is to figure out whether new genetic mechanisms can benefit organic field and sweet corn varieties,” Lubberstedt said. “We want to develop traits that can do well under organic conditions.”

KaitlinTogliatti, Sotirios V.Archontoulis, RanaeDietzel, LailaPuntel, AndyVanLoocke

Iowa State University agronomists and horticulturalists have joined forces to find the best relationship between row crops and perennial cover crops.

They were awarded a National Institute of Food and Agriculture grant this year as part of the agency’s effort to support research on agricultural systems and production of biomaterials and fuels. Ken Moore, David Laird, and Andy Lenssen, all professors of agronomy, and Shui-zhang Fei, associate professor of horticulture, make up the team.

Photo: Graduate student Allen Chen uses the light box he made to take photos of perennial cover crops in a test field west of Ames in September.

The team is studying turfgrass species to be used as perennial cover crops since they do well in cooler weather, Fei said. They planted several varieties of turf grasses in field trials west of Ames this fall to see which do not compete with corn production while still providing environmental benefits.

Iowa State University is honoring an agronomy professor with the title of Global Professorship in Biotechnology.

Kan Wang was presented with the professorship at a medallion ceremony Oct. 6, 2017 by Wendy Wintersteen, endowed dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Limiting Nitrogen Immobilization in Cover Crop Systems
Funded by the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy

Issue: Cover crops have significant potential to improve water quality by limiting erosion when row crops are not growing, and by limiting the loss of nitrogen by leaching. Yet widespread adoption has been limited, as the yield of subsequent-year corn crops may be negatively affected by cover crops. One reason for this is the potential for immobilization of nitrogen from soil organic matter as cover crop residues decompose.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Research