Extension

Extension and the Department

Since the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, faculty within the Department of Agronomy have served as Extension specialists sharing their knowledge and current research with Iowans to advance agriculture and improve environmental quality. Field agronomists also serve the state by offering field days, insight on current conditions and sharing thoughts on future circumstances. Our specialists and the Extension field agronomists are joined by colleagues in Entomology, Ag and Biosystems Engineering, Plant Pathology and Microbiology to form the producer's dream team called Integrated Crop Management.

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Putting It All Together: An Innovative Approach to Increasing Iowa's Conservation Infrastructure (2018-2021)

The goal of this project is to positively change the skill sets and attitudes of professional agronomists, farmers and agricultural students to accelerate the adoption of agricultural systems that build soil health and reduce nutrient losses.

Objectives include: 

Dr. John Pesek was a soil scientist, champion of sustainable agriculture, teacher and leader. Regrettably, our esteemed colleague passed away February 11. With over 40 years of service to the Department of Agronomy and Iowa State University, Dr. Pesek left a lasting legacy.

Dr. Pesek was born November 15, 1921 in Hallettsville, Texas. He received his bachelor’s degree in agriculture education from Texas A&M in 1943, at which point he entered the military. He was a member of the 98th Bomb Group within the 15th Air Force.

 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences recently selected outstanding faculty and staff to be awarded for their contributions to the education, service, research, and dedication that makes CALS so great. The Department of Agronomy would like to recognize our very own who were awarded.

 

 

An online, interactive course to develop successful long-term weed management programs.

Plan ahead. Dealing with herbicide resistance can be expensive. The United States Department of Agriculture estimates the cost of dealing with herbicide resistance once it occurs to be $20 to $60 per acre. Therefore, implementing a long-term weed management strategy that reduces the chances of resistance developing will maximize long-term profitability.

This online, interactive, and self-paced course contains narrated presentations, lesson activities, and resources to provide farmers and agribusiness professionals the tools to develop successful long-term weed management plans that will maximize long-term profitability. Well worth the $50 to register.

Register here

waterhemp seedling

The Iowa Crop Performance Tests are gearing up for their 100th year of gauging the yields of hundreds of seed varieties, an annual effort that helps farmers decide what seeds to plant the following year.

2019 Soil Health Conference Registration Is Open

Conference focus is on science and practices for advancing soil health

Mahdi Al-Kaisi

two hands holding soil.AMES, Iowa – The third Soil Health Conference will be held in Ames on Feb. 4-5, 2019. The event will consist of two full days of presentations on a wide variety of topics concerning soil health, with invited guest speakers from around the country.

ICM News

The Integrated Crop Management (ICM) website is a convenient, central location for producers to access a variety of crop production information, including: agronomy, soils and environment, weeds, integrated pest management, water quality, and grain handling and storage. Contributors to the site represent the Iowa State University Extension and Outreach crops team, which includes about 30 faculty and staff.

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Boone, Iowa held the nation’s largest outdoor farming event: The Farm Progress Show. This event took place August 28th through August 30th.  There were lots of new information to talk about over the three day event, some of that ranged from butterflies all the way to new tools that would greatly benefit agronomists.

Redefining the field edge (2018-2021)

This project seeks to reevaluate the traditional “field edge,” investigating the long-term productivity and profitability of in-field low lying depressional areas. While traditionally planted to agricultural row crops, in the majority of years these marginal areas require significant inputs resulting in only modest crop yields and returns on investment. Can these marginal land areas be taken out of row crop production and transitioned to perennial vegetation to increase the return on investment with fewer acres and less risk?

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